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Original Research 
RMJ. 2019; 44(1): 179-181


Preference of modalities and exercises by physiotherapists in low back pain

Kiran Haq.

Abstract
Objective: To determine which technique and treatment choices are used mostly by physiotherapists to treat the low back pain (LBP) in Pakistan.
Methodology: Physiotherapists who received a degree in physiotherapy and were actively working in major cities of Pakistan were selected for interview. A quantitative design, using a cross-sectional self-administered questionnaire survey over a period of one and a half months was used. Based on the total number of physiotherapists working at different government and private hospitals, private clinics and home visits, 150 were invited to participate in the study. The sample was based on the accessibility and willingness to provide information. A questionnaire with 6 closed-ended self-administered questions was used for data collection.

Results: Majority of the participants were females (75.3%). Majority (48.7%) were in the age group of 25-29 years. Private physiotherapists were 83.3%, 9.3% in Government hospitals, while 7.3% had self-clinic. Majority of the respondents (52.7%) reported TENS as preferred modality in posture syndrome, while “Hot packs” (17.3%) the second preferred modality. Few used ultrasound, short wave diathermy and traction. Regarding exercise, Flexion was the most popular exercise used by 70% of the physiotherapists in posture syndrome. In the case of dysfunction syndrome, majority used interferential current, followed by TENS and F-Traction. Female practitioners were more inclined to these procedures than men.

Conclusion: Physiotherapists used the best available modalities for treating LBP per their experiences. A number of factors such as lack of information, insufficient seminars and workshops were also found to be limiting factors for treatment choices of physiotherapists.

Key words: Low back Pain, Modalities, Hot packs


 
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Pubmed Style

Kiran Haq. Preference of modalities and exercises by physiotherapists in low back pain. RMJ. 2019; 44(1): 179-181.


Web Style

Kiran Haq. Preference of modalities and exercises by physiotherapists in low back pain. http://www.rmj.org.pk/?mno=288736 [Access: May 24, 2019].


AMA (American Medical Association) Style

Kiran Haq. Preference of modalities and exercises by physiotherapists in low back pain. RMJ. 2019; 44(1): 179-181.



Vancouver/ICMJE Style

Kiran Haq. Preference of modalities and exercises by physiotherapists in low back pain. RMJ. (2019), [cited May 24, 2019]; 44(1): 179-181.



Harvard Style

Kiran Haq (2019) Preference of modalities and exercises by physiotherapists in low back pain. RMJ, 44 (1), 179-181.



Turabian Style

Kiran Haq. 2019. Preference of modalities and exercises by physiotherapists in low back pain. Rawal Medical Journal, 44 (1), 179-181.



Chicago Style

Kiran Haq. "Preference of modalities and exercises by physiotherapists in low back pain." Rawal Medical Journal 44 (2019), 179-181.



MLA (The Modern Language Association) Style

Kiran Haq. "Preference of modalities and exercises by physiotherapists in low back pain." Rawal Medical Journal 44.1 (2019), 179-181. Print.



APA (American Psychological Association) Style

Kiran Haq (2019) Preference of modalities and exercises by physiotherapists in low back pain. Rawal Medical Journal, 44 (1), 179-181.








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